welcome

welcome

It’s the closest thing I’ve felt to death.

Birth.

5 days of labor and pushing and pain and sweat and utter exhaustion.

Birth.

Hours of almost readiness, a champ in the ring, waiting for her trophy.

Birth.

And he arrives, at a perfect Godly time with absolute intention.

Birth.

He comes uncracked, unwrinkled; life hasn’t stamped her good ol’ reality check on his skin. Not yet.

Birth.

Why do we cry? How does it crack our hearts wide open?

Birth.

We’ve all traveled this channel too. We have got to be as perfect, as divine, as uncracked?

Somewhere underneath. Right?

Clouds hiding the sun, type of shit. Right?

A son. A nephew. A gift.

Welcome.

dance with adversity

Abraham Lincoln

After his family was evicted from their home, he had to drop out of school to support them.

At age 21, he experienced his first failure in business. Then, at age 22, he ran for state legislature, and lost. He also lost his job in the process. So he applied for law school, but got rejected.

At 24, he borrowed some money from a friend to start another business, and within 12 months he was bankrupt. He spent the next 17 years of his life paying off this debt!

At 26, his first love died, leaving him heartbroken. This also led to a nervous breakdown a year later.

He was defeated when he ran for speaker of his state legislature. He also got rejected when he sought to become the elector.

He ran for Congress at 34, and was defeated again. Then he finally won, but lost his re-election.

He sought the job of land officer in his home state, and got rejected. At 45, he ran for Senate of the United States, and lost.

At 47, he sought the Vice-Presidential nomination at his party’s national convention, and got less than 100 votes. He ran for U.S. Senate again at 49, and lost for a second time.

Finally, at 52 years old, he became the 16th President of the United States.

Although he suffered from clinical depression throughout his life, his ability to handle conflict and dance with adversity was unmatched, and scholars now rank Abraham Lincoln as one of the greatest Presidents ever.

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Light

good deeds

good deeds

A remote tribe in the southern part of Africa was discovered to employ a unique tactic for righting a wrong:

When a person acts irresponsibly or unjustly, he is placed in the center of the village, alone and unfettered. All work ceases, while every man, woman, and child in the village gathers in a large circle around the accused individual.

Then, one at a time, each person in the tribe steps in front of the accused and recalls a positive deed the person in the circle has done in his lifetime. All of his positive attributes, good deeds, strengths, and kindnesses are recited carefully and at length. This ceremony can last for several days.

At the end, the circle is broken, a joyous celebration takes place, and the person is welcomed back into the good graces of the tribe.

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Light

a solid goodbye

a solid goodbye

Feel from the inside, she tells me.
Dive in.
It may mean breathing differently.
Close the door from the world and give it a few seconds longer to “log in”.
Stop from feeling through the mind, that doesn’t work.
Feel from the inside.
The guts, your innards.

She’s leaving me.
I definitely feel that.
The heart aches, the mind ever-so proud, the revenge pulsates.
But what for? And who cares?
Nothing changes what’s to come, she’s leaving me.

Stop being so dramatic.

Continue reading “a solid goodbye”

The giver and the giver

I had a friend whose mother packed her lunch every day for school when she was in first grade. It was later discovered that the child had been giving away half of her food each afternoon to another first grader whose parents couldn’t afford packed lunches.

Instead of berating the child for sharing her only sustenance, her mother began sending her to school with two lunches—one for her, and one for her classmate.

This is the essence of how reciprocity works: as the child shared what she had, she eventually received even more of it to give. In other words, reciprocity is between the giver and the giver, not the giver and the receiver.

Light