The giver and the giver

I had a friend whose mother packed her lunch every day for school when she was in first grade. It was later discovered that the child had been giving away half of her food each afternoon to another first grader whose parents couldn’t afford packed lunches.

Instead of berating the child for sharing her only sustenance, her mother began sending her to school with two lunches—one for her, and one for her classmate.

This is the essence of how reciprocity works: as the child shared what she had, she eventually received even more of it to give. In other words, reciprocity is between the giver and the giver, not the giver and the receiver.

Light

dear sugar

Cheryl Strayed Dear Sugar

Sunday morning.
The sun peeps through clouds.
I am dreaming of another time, another place, another life.
I look around and imagine life behind another’s closed doors.

I think of Dear Sugar, of Cheryl Strayed.
What a powerhouse.
A heart as big as houses.
As dense, mysterious and spacious as that corner one over there, with the high-reaching trees that guard it.

I think of the vulnerability of humans.
How we seek help from strangers, without filter, without fear.
Parental issues, a miscarriage, an affair, coming out, etc.
Here we are asking each other to hold our hand, to be there as we walk through a dark patch.
Cheryl, Dear sugar, is a real Street Level Miracle.
Radically empathetic.

Take a listen or read the book some time.

100% is a breeze

“Successful people adhere to the ‘no exceptions rule’ when it comes to their daily disciplines. Once you make a 100% commitment to something, there are no exceptions. It’s a done deal. Non-negotiable. Case closed! Over and out.”

— Jack Canfield, from The Success Principles

When we figure out what we are fully committed to in our life, it usually involves taking on new habits—and the thing with any new habit is this: “99% is a bitch, and 100% is a breeze.”

In other words, if we have to debate and negotiate with ourself every day about whether or not we’re going to honor our commitment, there’s a high probability that we’re going to eventually revert back to our old ways… especially when the voice kicks in. You know the voice: “You deserve a little more sleep this morning.” “Take a day off.” “No need to be so rigid.” “Nobody will know you skipped.”

Making our new habits non-negotiable may indeed sound rigid at first, but it can also be quite liberating, because we don’t have to waste our time and energy trying to decide whether today is going to be the day we break.

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Light Watkins

street level miracles

I am the co-creator of a film production company, Subway Token Films. We are always on the hunt for Street Level Miracles, the philosophy behind our films: these are moments in our lives when the story as we know it stops, the lens is pulled back and something expansive is revealed to us. Kinda like catching the glimpse of a whale out in the sea.

This here is a perfect example of one. Enjoy.

#ThaiLifeInsurance

 

voluntary hardship

What kind of voluntary hardship do you practice?

Sure, it’s the cold showers, going without sugar/fats/drink alcohol, it’s cooking homemade food (if it’s not your norm), getting off your phone, underdressing for the weather — all the hard shit that’s about YOU.

But what about voluntary hardship for others?

Opening the door for a stranger, smiling to a fellow pedestrian, buying lunch for the guy behind you, calling your mother/father for no particular reason, volunteering for the homeless, listening vs trying to fix it, calling your local congress, recycling (for real), eating less, drinking less, going without anger/judgment/distrust?

Let’s shift the perspective away from ourselves and onto others.
Let’s move our DNA for mankind.
Liza Fernandez