The Triumph of ‘Wonder Woman’

The Triumph of Wonder Woman

The box office has made its ruling, and the verdict is clear. You can’t keep a wonderful woman down.

“Wonder Woman,” which opened this weekend, is a mammoth hit, meeting the most optimistic expectations and setting up its director, Patty Jenkins, for a place in the record books. It’s on track to earn between $90 and $105 million domestically by Monday morning, according to industry projections. That’s the best debut ever for a movie directed by a woman.

My colleague Maureen Dowd explored this stark gender disparity in a cover story for The Times’s magazine in late 2015, noting that in the previous two years, “women were only 1.9 percent of the directors for the 100 top-grossing films.”

“Excluding their art-house divisions, the six major studios released only three movies last year with a female director,” Dowd added, referring to 2014.

And since then? According to The Hollywood Reporter, women represented 9 percent of the directors of the 250 top-grossing movies domestically in 2015 and just 7 percent last year.

“Wonder Woman” is an important challenge to that unconscionable imbalance. It’s an equally important step toward more big-screen portrayals of female characters as strong, independent leaders. There’s been some improvement on that front, perhaps best exemplified by “The Hunger Games” franchise, but in the realm of superheroes, women have continued to lag far behind, as I noted in a column in late 2013 about how often a “Wonder Woman” movie had been contemplated, how long the wait for it was turning out to be, and how determined Hollywood was to mint new male superheroes in the meantime.

The producer, director and writer Ryan Murphy is championing female directors through a resolve to give at least 50 percent of the directing jobs on his television series — which include “American Crime Story,” “American Horror Story” and “Feud ”— to women, people of color or L.G.B.T. people. The first season of “Feud,” which explored the relationship between Joan Crawford and Bette Davis, wasn’t simply fantastic; it was one of the sharpest, most painful examinations ever of how brutally and reductively so many women are treated as they grow older, particularly in Hollywood. The lineup of Sunday-night television that “Feud” was a part of also included “Girls,” “Big Little Lies” and more: a trove of meaty, juicy roles for actresses of all ages.

Sofia Coppola just won the best director prize at Cannes, for her movie “The Beguiled,” becoming only the second woman to nab that award. It’s ridiculous that there have only been two. But two is a whole lot better than one.

And now here’s “Wonder Woman,” proving that magical bracelets can have the same power — both on the battlefield and at the box office — as a flashy codpiece. She’s fresher than any “Batman” of late and fiercer than any “Superman” of recent vintage, but she’s lonely. May her sorority expand, and fast.

Read the full New York Times article here.

all we did was play

 

We’ve been conditioned to move from a place of what loves us and almost every decision we make now is based on what other people think about us.

If you are under the illusion that these things outside of you are what complete you, you will always be a victim because everything has to change to make you happy.

When you were a kid you were just effortlessly creating and living in the moment, and that same effortless creativity is available to you right now. You are what you love, not what loves you.

__

Kyle Cease

http://www.evolvingoutloud.com

whirlwind

big burly man

He’s a burly man. Strong voice, 80s New York accent.
Big personality. Vibrant and ecstatic to be near his friend.
He talks about flying in from a job, being put up in a hotel tomorrow night, can I crash with you guys tonight?

Of course.
I’m surprised you’d want to do that.
Yes. Done.
Thank you for wanting to.

He talks this job and that job, what’s in the horizons and pitting this one against that one.
“Angela is in San Diego doing a play, I had to come back for meetings until Friday and then we fly back to NY in 4 days.”
Let’s go for dinner.

Yes, of course.
Thank you for thinking of us.
We’ll take you to our favorite sushi joint, you’ll love it.
Done.

A whirlwind.

I yearn. I crave. I sink into nostalgia.

Is that the life of an artist? I mean, a real one?
Is that what success looks like?
Is that what happens?

I smell movement.
I feel combustion.
Opportunities.
Movin’ and shakin’.
Action.
I smell living out loud.

All well and good but will I use these feelings for me or against me?
Will they choke me or accompany me on this journey?

I’m here for an argument

I was just talking about this skit with friends the other night.
Here’s what creativity, teamwork and joy can bring the world.

Ladies and gentlemen, Monty Python:

“I cut down trees, I skip and jump, I like to press wildflowers.
I put on women’s clothing and hang around in bars.”
– Michael Palin, 1969.

all we did was play

 

We’ve been conditioned to move from a place of what loves us and almost every decision we make now is based on what other people think about us.

If you are under the illusion that these things outside of you are what complete you, you will always be a victim because everything has to change to make you happy.

When you were a kid you were just effortlessly creating and living in the moment, and that same effortless creativity is available to you right now. You are what you love, not what loves you.

__
Kyle Cease
http://www.evolvingoutloud.com

no wheel inventing needed

no wheel inventing needed

A movie script is composed of the following:

1. Hero stars in Ordinary World

2. Hero receives Call to Adventure

3. Hero rejects Call

4. Hero meets Mentor, Mentor gives hero courage to accept the Call

5. Hero crosses Threshold, enters Special World

6. Hero encounters enemies and allies, undergoes ordeal that will serve as his Initiation

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