the path

the path

HE: I just got back!

SHE: Ah! Beirut! How was it?

HE: Insane, four long months, but so much fun.

SHE: I can only imagine. How was New Mexico?!

HE: Soooo good, great to see the fam. It’s been a minute.

SHE: Aw, that’s so good. Tell me all about Beirut!

She looks at him, through him, in awe.
She eases her envious heart by recalling their conversation from a year ago:

“Build references you’re going to need them. How? Do everything you can think of Now. Before you get busy, before the work comes in hard and heavy, before it all changes.
Go to museums, listen to music, fuck everyone, try every kind of food. Do it all, but all the while: keep. going.
Cuz suddenly, it goes from some times to all the time, and then your schedule is booked 2 years in advance.”

Trust.
Faith.
Stay on the path.

on freedom

on freedom

Nelson Mandela spent 27 years in prison. Confined to a small cell without a bed or plumbing, he was forced to do hard labor in a quarry. He could write and receive a letter once every six months, and once a year he was allowed to meet with a visitor for only 30 minutes.

After his release, he said: “As I walked out the door toward the gate that would lead to my freedom, I knew if I didn’t leave my bitterness and hatred behind, I’d still be in prison.”

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Light Watkins

no days off

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Bob Marley was shot in his home just two days before he was set to headline a free concert to help unite the political factions in Jamaica. He was warned of more violence if he appeared on stage.

However, he refused to let the threats of violence or his poor health deter him, and ended up delivering an inspired performance before 80,000 of his countrymen—one of the most impactful shows of his career.

When asked why he still played the concert even after being shot and threatened, Bob explained, “The people who are trying to make this world worse aren’t taking a day off. So how can I?”
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Light Watkins

The giver and the giver

I had a friend whose mother packed her lunch every day for school when she was in first grade. It was later discovered that the child had been giving away half of her food each afternoon to another first grader whose parents couldn’t afford packed lunches.

Instead of berating the child for sharing her only sustenance, her mother began sending her to school with two lunches—one for her, and one for her classmate.

This is the essence of how reciprocity works: as the child shared what she had, she eventually received even more of it to give. In other words, reciprocity is between the giver and the giver, not the giver and the receiver.

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